Chickens

Resources About Chickens

An image of three panes from a brochure. The leftmost panel shows a rooster standing on an exam table. The middle panel shows a graphic of a rooster and a book, as well as two photos of roosters and a graphic of a chicken. The third panel on the right shows an image of a woman holding a rooster.
A new sanctuary brochure for so that you can help more folks learn some truths about roosters, which may help with facilitating rooster retention,
A new sanctuary brochure for so that you can help more folks learn some truths about roosters, which may help with facilitating rooster retention, getting foster homes, and more adopters!
The history and current challenges of the domesticated chicken.
The history and current challenges of the domesticated chicken.
Daily observation plays an important role in catching signs of concern early. Do you know what to look for when observing chicken residents?
Daily observation plays an important role in catching signs of concern early. Do you know what to look for when observing chicken residents?
HPAI prevention methods and biosecurity protocols in a simple bulleted checklist format.
HPAI prevention methods and biosecurity protocols in a simple bulleted checklist format.
An infographic with key points to help your sanctuary protect your avian residents from avian influenza.
An infographic with key points to help your sanctuary protect your avian residents from avian influenza.
An introductory guide to avian influenza including answers to the most frequently asked questions about this disease.
An introductory guide to avian influenza including answers to the most frequently asked questions about this disease.

Fun Facts About Chickens

Did you know that many chickens (less so in large breed chickens) choose to “work” for their food? This is called contra-freeloading. Chickens have demonstrated that they will often choose to press a button or ring a bell for food instead of eating from a readily available food source. They may enjoy the extra engagement and stimulation provided.
Chickens are able to see more colors than humans! While the human retina contains cones that are sensitive to wavelengths of red, blue and green, chickens have an additional cone that can detect violet wavelengths, including some ultraviolet wavelengths!
While it might just sound like a bunch of clucking to an unfamiliar observer, chicken “language” consists of at least 24 different vocalizations! This doesn’t even include how they communicate through visual displays.

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